Upwards over the mountain

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THE CATCHY TITLE OF MY PAPER

whatshouldwecallgradschool:

Throwback Thursday! Brought to you by July 2012!

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credit: Manuel

Hey new folks!

Got a smattering of new followers recently, so I thought I’d take a moment to say hello to you all!

Hope you enjoy your stay. Also, you should check out my “other” blogging endeavor sometime, Shit You Didn’t Know About Biology (http://sydkab.com/).

chrisbrinleejr:

They call me, “Fish Slayer.”

Photos by danielbrucelee.

Actually me.

emmiebar5:

i’m sorry, but this tweet is the best

emmiebar5:

i’m sorry, but this tweet is the best

gaydicks420:

shuckl:

shuckl:

shuckl:

untapped aesthetic: surrealist jock

a varsity jacket but it has three arms and it’s melting

your football shoulder pads have grass growing out of them and they constantly hum

you shove nerds not into lockers, but into other planes of existence. your football is always singing, singing, singing. the astroturf changes colors beneath you, and whispers the name of every person you’ve ever loved.

Eucalyptus regnans, Tallest Tree in the South

New post up.

100,000-Year-Old Case of Brain Damage Discovered

strangeremains:

rhamphotheca:

A pair of diabolical Smooth Lumpfish (Aptocyclus ventricosus), from the Northern Pacific, devise plans for world domination and the end of civilization… an also freeze-dried krill treats.
(via: Alaska SeaLife Center)

rhamphotheca:

A pair of diabolical Smooth Lumpfish (Aptocyclus ventricosus), from the Northern Pacific, devise plans for world domination and the end of civilization… an also freeze-dried krill treats.

(via: Alaska SeaLife Center)

WHEN MY PI ASKS HOW MY PROJECT IS COMING ALONG

whatshouldwecallgradschool:

credit: Bensun

rhamphotheca:

First Live Observations of a Rarely Seen Deep Sea Anglerfish

by Dana Lacono (August, 2012)

With a bulbous body and spiky scales, a shaggy lure dangling from its head, and foot-like fins that it uses to “walk” along the seafloor, the deep-sea anglerfish Chaunacops coloratus looks like something out of a Dr. Seuss book.

In a recent paper, MBARI researcher Lonny Lundsten and his coauthors describe the first observations of these rare fish in their natural, deep-sea habitat. In addition to documenting these fish walking on the seafloor and fishing with their built-in lures, the researchers discovered that the fish change color from blue to red as they get older.

C. coloratus was first described from a single specimen collected off the coast of Panama during an expedition in 1891 aboard the U.S. Fish Commission steamer Albatross. However, for over 100 years, marine researchers collected deep-sea fish using trawl nets and dredges, so this anglerfish was never seen alive. That changed in 2002, when researchers from MBARI, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary used the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Tiburon to explore Davidson Seamount—an extinct volcano off the coast of Central California…

(read more: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute)

(Source: taylorandtiffany)

officialwhitegirls:

2000yr:

What the hell is the science side of tumblr

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^One small smidgen of the science side of Tumblr.

biomorphosis:

Baby brown bear.

biomorphosis:

Baby brown bear.

Prehistoric Animals

paleoillustration:

Submitted by arse-moriendi:

Hi all! I was cleaning out my garage when I found this little treasure:

This books has been well-loved over the years, as evidenced by the scribbling (not me, I swear) and it is, unfortunately missing a few pages. But I scanned them and cleaned them up as best I could, and now I want to share one of my favorite books:

buggirl:

My camera couldn’t capture the brilliance of the luminescence produced by this Click beetle.  It is a Pyrophorus spp.
These beetles are also known as “headlight beetles” for obvious reasons.  It was quite incredible, they shined continuously and brighter than any lightning bug I have ever encountered.

I read this about them, coincidentally, from the father of the entomologist that runs my school’s collections:

"Headlight beetles are large click beetles notable among click beetles in their unique ability to produce light. An intense glow emanates from two round luminescent organs on the prothorax and a broad area on the underside of the first abdominal segment. In flight both sexes produce a brilliant blue-green streak of light that dazzles the onlooker."-Charles L. Hogue

Tiputini, Ecuador

Like my posts?  Click here to view my research proposal.