Upwards over the mountain

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biomorphosis:

Baby brown bear.

biomorphosis:

Baby brown bear.

Prehistoric Animals

paleoillustration:

Submitted by arse-moriendi:

Hi all! I was cleaning out my garage when I found this little treasure:

This books has been well-loved over the years, as evidenced by the scribbling (not me, I swear) and it is, unfortunately missing a few pages. But I scanned them and cleaned them up as best I could, and now I want to share one of my favorite books:

buggirl:

My camera couldn’t capture the brilliance of the luminescence produced by this Click beetle.  It is a Pyrophorus spp.
These beetles are also known as “headlight beetles” for obvious reasons.  It was quite incredible, they shined continuously and brighter than any lightning bug I have ever encountered.

I read this about them, coincidentally, from the father of the entomologist that runs my school’s collections:

"Headlight beetles are large click beetles notable among click beetles in their unique ability to produce light. An intense glow emanates from two round luminescent organs on the prothorax and a broad area on the underside of the first abdominal segment. In flight both sexes produce a brilliant blue-green streak of light that dazzles the onlooker."-Charles L. Hogue

Tiputini, Ecuador

Like my posts?  Click here to view my research proposal.

psychoticsnake:

robotspider:

When you are sad, just remember that jumping spiders sometimes wear water droplets as hats
image
image
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I have arachnophobia

and I still think this is adorable

THEY LOOK SO HAPPY!! 

(Source: robotspider)

markscherz:

birdandmoon:

Venomous vs poisonous! The animals are: northern copperhead, cane toad, tiger keelback snake, hooded pitohui, northern short-tailed shrew.

#omg cute   #seriously though why don’t people teach this in school   #my tenured cell bio professor doesn’t know the difference   (via mothbug)
First - this is adorable and excellent, birdandmoon - as always! Second, I just wanted to address the question asked by Gina in her tags.
The reason many people don’t know about this is that it is a relatively new distinction. It is being self-enforced by the fairly logical nature of the terminology and a lot of particularly anal grammar Nazis. Indeed, most dictionaries do not give a satisfactory definition of venom vs. poison vs. toxin (as I basically explained in this post on the subject), and fifty years ago it was not as important, allowing for the publication of this jarringly titled book:

[x] - a copy of which resides in my office.
Another reason that this problem persists is that it is not universal. I dare say most languages do not make a distinction between venom and poison: as a fun game, go here and try different languages into which to translate ‘venom’, ‘poison’, and ‘toxin’. Of the several I tried, only Irish, French, English, and, curiously, Hebrew and Armenian, made any distinction.
Nevertheless, I believe the distinction of venom and poison to be a very important advancement of the English language, particularly with regard to science.

markscherz:

birdandmoon:

Venomous vs poisonous! The animals are: northern copperhead, cane toad, tiger keelback snake, hooded pitohui, northern short-tailed shrew.

#omg cute   #seriously though why don’t people teach this in school   #my tenured cell bio professor doesn’t know the difference   (via mothbug)

First - this is adorable and excellent, birdandmoon - as always! Second, I just wanted to address the question asked by Gina in her tags.

The reason many people don’t know about this is that it is a relatively new distinction. It is being self-enforced by the fairly logical nature of the terminology and a lot of particularly anal grammar Nazis. Indeed, most dictionaries do not give a satisfactory definition of venom vs. poison vs. toxin (as I basically explained in this post on the subject), and fifty years ago it was not as important, allowing for the publication of this jarringly titled book:

Poisonous snakes of the world

[x] - a copy of which resides in my office.

Another reason that this problem persists is that it is not universal. I dare say most languages do not make a distinction between venom and poison: as a fun game, go here and try different languages into which to translate ‘venom’, ‘poison’, and ‘toxin’. Of the several I tried, only Irish, French, English, and, curiously, Hebrew and Armenian, made any distinction.

Nevertheless, I believe the distinction of venom and poison to be a very important advancement of the English language, particularly with regard to science.

(Source: dorrismccomics)

Oh. You poor soul.

Oh. You poor soul.

(Source: buttcraft)

jtotheizzoe:

Ever wondered how your body knows left from right? Why our bodies are asymmetrical on the inside, despite being so symmetrical on the outside? 

And why on Earth does singer Donny Osmond, like 1 in 20,000 people, have mirror-image inverted organs?

In this video, part 3 of my special series on how our bodies evolved to look the way that they do, find out the science of your asymmetry.

Watch below:

thenorthwestexplorer:

Triple Falls

Location: Columbia River Gorge, OR

Date: 7/17/14

liompayne:

"what did u do all day?"

image

(Source: swedishpapa)

Boxfish: Little Fish, Big Toxins

New post up at Shit You Didn’t Know About Biology.

buggirl:

Adorable baby tarantula we found in the jungle.  His little feet remind me of how puppy feet are way too big for their bodies.
Tiputini, Ecuador

buggirl:

Adorable baby tarantula we found in the jungle.  His little feet remind me of how puppy feet are way too big for their bodies.

Tiputini, Ecuador

thrillboswaggins:

girlwhowasonfire:

shitangiggle:

girlwhowasonfire:

Petition to ban old men from writing books just because they don’t know how to use an iPhone

Petition to have the youth in this country to actually educate themselves instead of spitting out some bullshit they read on some shitty post on facebook that’s untrue, and continues to spread like wildfire.

In 2012, young adults set the record of completing both high school and college and are on course to become the most educated generation in American history. Maybe you should follow the example of ‘the youth in this country’ and do the same.

thrillboswaggins:

girlwhowasonfire:

shitangiggle:

girlwhowasonfire:

Petition to ban old men from writing books just because they don’t know how to use an iPhone

Petition to have the youth in this country to actually educate themselves instead of spitting out some bullshit they read on some shitty post on facebook that’s untrue, and continues to spread like wildfire.

In 2012, young adults set the record of completing both high school and college and are on course to become the most educated generation in American history. Maybe you should follow the example of ‘the youth in this country’ and do the same.

image

biomorphosis:

Saiga is a type of antelope. They are known for their huge, inflatable, and humped nose which help them to filter out airborne dust during the dry summer migrations, and filter out cold air before it reaches their lungs during winter. They are a migratory species, migrating in the summer and winter and can run up to 80 km per hour in a short time.

Local people kill saiga because of its meat and horns. Horns are used in traditional Chinese medicine. Saiga is listed as critically endangered species and were once in the millions but today only less than 50,000 left in the wild.

libutron:

Yellow Kneed Sea Spider
Despite their appearance, the so called Sea spiders are not actually true spiders, they are marine arthropods belonging to the Class Pycnogonida, but in fact their relationships are enigmatic. They may represent a very early branching of the chelicerate lineage. There are approximately 1000 described species of pycnogonids, all of which are marine.
Pycnogonids vaguely resemble spiders, with small bodies and relatively long, hinged legs. Unique characteristics include an unusual proboscis (mouthparts), which varies in size and shape among species. The body itself is not divisible into neatly- organized tagmata or regions as it is in most other arthropods. An anterior region bears, besides the proboscis, three or four pairs of appendages, including the first pair of walking legs. Some species have more than four pairs of walking legs. 
The photo shows a showy pycnogonid in the Family Callipallenidae. 
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Sylke Rohrlach
Locality: New South Wales, Australia

libutron:

Yellow Kneed Sea Spider

Despite their appearance, the so called Sea spiders are not actually true spiders, they are marine arthropods belonging to the Class Pycnogonidabut in fact their relationships are enigmatic. They may represent a very early branching of the chelicerate lineage. There are approximately 1000 described species of pycnogonids, all of which are marine.

Pycnogonids vaguely resemble spiders, with small bodies and relatively long, hinged legs. Unique characteristics include an unusual proboscis (mouthparts), which varies in size and shape among species. The body itself is not divisible into neatly- organized tagmata or regions as it is in most other arthropods. An anterior region bears, besides the proboscis, three or four pairs of appendages, including the first pair of walking legs. Some species have more than four pairs of walking legs. 

The photo shows a showy pycnogonid in the Family Callipallenidae. 

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Sylke Rohrlach

Locality: New South Wales, Australia